Writing is hard

The title says it all.

I think we’re done here.

But seriously, writing is hard. For me, the initial drafting is usually the easy part. Especially if I’ve done some planning and outlining, the writing flows pretty well. Or so it always seemed. But as I’m continuing my way through my writing exercises, it’s bringing up so many additional things that I’m conscious of, but not quite sure I’m being purposeful about.

For example, one of the exercises was titled “Hemmingway’s Iceberg,” a prompt where you write a detailed character description, then try to convey information about the character in short sentences, showing instead of telling. That’s usually one thing I’m pretty keyed in to when it comes to my writing, and something I usually catch when I’m editing. But following the advice of everyone for writing is overwhelming. Should I outline my whole entire story in immense detail? Should I write detailed character sketches for everyone? Or just main characters?

I’ve always been a little bit more of the “fly by the seat of your pants” kind of writer. I’ve adapted some, and in my last few projects I have done moderately detailed outlines, which has truly helped in the process. But I’m afraid of getting so bogged down in the planning that, when the times comes, writing the story has lost the joy of creation and discovery, which is what has always drawn me to writing in the first place.

So what’s the answer? For me, it’s just doing my own thing. If I’m having a hard time with dialogue or my character doesn’t feel real, I’ll take it as a sign that I need to do a sketch and compare words and actions with who my character is. If I’m stuck with writers block, I know I need to sit down and map out where I’m at and where my story needs to be.

Best practices aren’t for everyone. Writing is a very personal endeavor, and as such, what works for me won’t necessarily work for you. But, writing is also about having various tools to use when you need them. And with that in mind, it’s good to know some of those best practices, and have a plan in place for when you might need them.

 

So, after all that blah, blah, blah,  I’ll share a personal bit of writing, from the last exercise I didn’t do a few weeks back, the one on getting inspiration from the art world. It took me a little bit of time, but once I thought of it, it just flowed. Maybe you can guess what painting inspired it.

Sometimes, the most beautiful things emerge from individual strokes of chaos.

In a painting, a million wild strokes swirl to form a starry night. The swirls lead your eye across the piece, drawing you into nostalgia, remembering your favorite starry nights.

But when you’re down in the trenches,where the swirls become a maze of canyon walls, you don’t always see the beautiful, just the chaos.

I was in the trenches, to say the least. I was 24 years old, married, living independently, making my own appointments, and utterly overwhelmed by anxiety and stalled dreams.

It wasn’t that I hated my job, I worked hard, but the constant human interaction was draining. It was more that… I was more. I had a degree, I had career goals and dreams, and as the years ticked by and graduation faded, it was hard to believe someone would hire me with barely any experience, so long after school.

And my personal dreams–don’t even get me started. I loved writing, but I was lazy and didn’t always like to edit. I didn’t have any left over energy for another full-time job. All my other hobbies I essentially gave up when I moved. So if my life wasn’t intended to be what I wanted, what was it to be?

I wonder if painters ever feel this way, like their just throwing strokes onto canvas and waiting to see what emerges–art birthed from chaos.

But then, isn’t that what life is all about? Finding beauty in our own personal chaos. To keep painting until the picture emerges, and we can see what we’ve made.

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