Alias Grace

When the holiday dust settled and I calculated how much I had in Barnes and Noble gift cards, I knew two things: first, I was going to finally buy and finish the Outlander series, and second, that I was going to buy Alias Grace.

After watching the Netflix adaptation, I knew Margaret Atwood’s book was one that I needed to read and that I would really enjoy. I was right on both counts.

Grace Marks is a condemned murderess and has been in a penitentiary since she was 16 years old. She’s also spent some time in insane asylums. Psychologist Simeon Jordan is intrigued by her case, presented to her by a committee that is constantly petitioning for Grace’s release, believing her innocent. Grace herself says she can’t remember what happened that fateful day when her employer and his housekeeper were murdered. A scientist through and through, Jordan arranges a series of interviews with Grace to try to coax the truth out of her, but what he discovers will push his scientific mind to the limits and challenge what he is able to believe.

The bulk of the book is written in first person as Grace relating her life story to Jordan, thus, it’s written in a very casual and conversational tone, which makes the reading fast, as does the desire to know, is Grace insane, guilty, or innocent?

As I was reading this book, I was reminded of Cat Winters’ Yesternight (though, of course, this was written first), in that, despite being a fictional work, it challenges what you’re willing to believe, and leaves a degree of ambiguity at the conclusion.

And though it is a work of fiction, it is based on real people and a real case, which I find quite interesting as well. Atwood’s author’s note at the end provides clarification for what she drew from historical records (however conflicting and confusing) and what is creative liberties (mostly where records and facts were missing).

Atwood’s characters, and probably the real people behind them, are complex, and the reader gets the opportunity to puzzle things out herself, which makes for an engaging story. So for those who enjoy psychology, brain-teaser books, and just plain interesting stories, Alias Grace should move up to the top of your list. You won’t be disappointed.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s