Tag Archives: science

John Glenn: A Memoir

I’ll admit, I was interested in this book, not because I knew who John Glenn was, but because I’d looked it up for a customer at work and saw that it was a biography on an astronaut. Sometimes I think that if I could go back, knowing what I know about myself now, I probably would have pursued a career in science, and maybe even my dreams of being an astronaut. But, on to the book review.

The book is an autobiography that explores John Glenn’s life from childhood during the Great Depression, to his joining the military and becoming a fighter pilot during World War II, all the way through his two trips to space–the last when he was 77 years old (maybe it’s not too late for me!).

Glenn writes in a very plain way, unassuming. You get the feeling he is just telling his story, not trying to brag about anything he’s done or reap glory for being an American icon and hero. It feels very much like sitting down and listening to your grandfather regale you with stories from his life. Sometimes you can almost here the laugh that goes along with a funny anecdote.

Glenn’s biography is encouraging and inspiring too, a representation of chasing dreams and making a difference through hard and dedicated work. Not to mention just cool to see how much history this guy lived through.

Overall, it was a fun and pretty fast read, considering it’s more than 500 pages. If you like history, science, airplanes or politics, it’s the read for you.

Elon Musk

A few weeks ago (OK, maybe a month) I stared watching Mars on the National Geographic channel. I have only watched the first episode, but it was enough to get me interested in the person of Elon Musk.

I knew the name, knew he was linked with Tessa and SpaceX, but I was curious to know more.

In her book called “Elon Musk” journalist Ashlee Vance provides a detailed look at Musk’s life. He fee up in South Africa and always dreamed of making it to America. Once he did, he found himself constantly partaking in a variety of start-up companies.

In addition to SpaceX, Tesla, and SolarCity, Musk was involved in Zip2, a kind of MapQuest meets Yelp, as well as PayPal.

It is quite interesting to read and get a peek inside the man who has his finger in so many different but related fields of engineering and technology. You get a feel from Vance’s writing that Musk has two speeds: stop and go, and he doesn’t usually stop, even when every rational indication is saying to.

It’s also easy to read about him and big into his big dreams. Somehow, after reading Musk’s history, a colony on Mars doesn’t feel like a sci-fi story anymore.

In her reporting and writing, Vance speaks to a variety of people, and gives voice to all their opinions, good or bad. She does not paint a picture of Musk one way or the other, she shares her observations and the comments of Musk and others.

Overall, reading the book, one gets a sense of thorough research and evenness. And though Musk deals in very technical fields, the book is not bogged down by either jargon nor lengthy explanations.

For anyone interested in Musk or any of his companies, I think it’s an interesting read. It’s almost a case study of how hard work and dedication can allow for the seeming impossible to become a reality.